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Cucamelon Cucumber (Melothria scabra)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Small oval-shaped cucumber, green striped with pale green, resembling a watermelon. 2 to 3 cm in diameter only! Cucumber and lemon flavor. Can be eaten raw or candied. Also called Mouse Melon, Mexican Cucumber, Gherkin Cucumber.
Yellowstone Carrots (Daucus carota var. sativus)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
This variety is smooth and of a beautiful yellow color. It is a fairly early variety with a very good sweet flavor. It does not become tough, even forgotten in the garden. It is very juicy and delicious both raw and cooked. It will be like a ray of sunshine on your plates!

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Daucus carota var. satisfied
Common names: Yellow carrot
English: Yellow carrot
Family: Apiaceae
French Sorrel (Rumex Acetosa)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Common sorrel variety with large green leaves. This perennial, tangy and lemony, will liven up your soups and salads. Harvest the leaves when they are still young and tender. Little tip: French sorrel can also be used to soothe stings (from nettle and bugs) by rubbing the leaves on the skin.

CARE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS: Contains oxalic acid, do not consume in excess.
Saint-Anne shallots (Allium ascalonicum)
9.99 $ 9.99 $ 9.99 CAD
Sale between july 20th and november 15th only

** CANNOT BE SHIPPED OUTSIDE OF CANADA **
This product is only available to order between July 1 and November 1 of each year. Treasures of our Quebec heritage, the Sainte-Anne shallot is a perfectly perennial alliaceae. It comfortably spends our Quebec winters under the cover of snow without any damage. It grows in the spring, very early, and we can then taste it as a green shallot. Then it multiplies and its foliage dries up. We will pull it out on June 24, on St-Jean Baptiste Day. Then we will dry it completely at home, to eat it but also to replant it at Ste-Anne, on July 26th. It will begin to grow again and store up for the winter. Then we start again in the spring!This product is only available between July 1 and November 1 of each year.Package of 8 shallots from Ste-Anne;For more information, * The price of this item is a little higher than our regular pouches to cover shipping costs*

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Allium ascalonicum
Common names: Shallots of Saint-Anne
English: Saint-Anne shallots
Family: Liliaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
The shallot winters well in Quebec, under the snow cover, but does not keep well indoors.
Aconcagua pepper (Capsicum anuum)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Aconcagua is a peak in Argentina located thirteen kilometers from the Chilean border and rising 6,962 meters above sea level. Nicknamed "America's Colossus", it is the highest point in the Andes Mountains. This variety of pepper that was named in his honor bears huge fruits, which can reach 30 cm in length and 320 grams. Pale green in color, they turn red when ripe. Very tasty they can be used in salads or on the grill. Very productive variety.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Capsicum anuum
Common names: Acuncagua pepper, sweet pepper
English: Acuncagua pepper
Family: Solanaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Love the heat.
Mafane brèdes (Acmella oleracea)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
This surprising plant produces button flowers that have a pungent peppery flavor that is strongest in the open yellow flowers. The flowers especially are slightly anesthetic, the effect produced is very particular. The leaves are eaten fresh during the day after harvest. They can be kept for three days in the refrigerator rolled up in a damp cloth. They can also be dried and used later.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Acmella oleracea
Common names: Pará Watercress, Garden Spilanthe, Jambu, Anamalaho, Kimotodoha, Kimalao
English: Toothache plant, paracress, Sichuan buttons, buzz buttons, tingflowers, electric daisy
Family: Asteraceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Likes the heat and a little afraid of the wind. Pot culture possible
Tomato Hundred Years (Solanum lycopersicum)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Kahnawake Mohawk Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Vigorous climbing bean that can reach 12 feet. Soft green pods, sweet and slightly flattened bean. Very productive. Usually grown for its dry, beige grain streaked with chocolate veins, but can be eaten fresh as well. Climbs so high that our stakes could not resist and fell at the end of the season, under the weight of the plants. Originally cultivated by the Iroquois First Nations of Kahnawake (Quebec). One of the finest beans in our collection.
True Red Cranberry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Climbing bean to be shelled. Variety from the Abenaki First Nations and part of the Slow Food Ark of Taste. The beans, when dry, are a fiery red making them look like a cranberry. White hilt. Rich flavor. Rare variety having been rediscovered by bean collector John Withee, who got it from Mr. Taylor of Steep Falls, Maine, after 11 years of research. He had read the description in an encyclopedia dating back to the 1700s. In 1981, John Withee donated his collection of 1,186 beans to the Seed Savers Exchange (USA). This variety appeared in several eastern New England catalogs in the 1850s, including one from Montreal, dated 1899, which listed this variety as very popular.

Nose Pierced Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dwarf green bean with very small delicate pods. Early and prolific, this variety gives small seeds of a beautiful golden brown. It would come from the Nez Percé Native American tribe. Maintained for generations by the Denny family of Idaho (1930), this bean will produce certain twigs (“runner”) about 3 feet that can be staked or left on the ground. Can be eaten dry or fresh. 5 to 6 seeds per pod. Endangered, please share!

Staking is not compulsory, can bush on the ground.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris
Common names: Bean 'Nez Perce
English: Nez perce beans, Indian woman yellow beans.
Family: Fabaceae
Mennonite bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Very vigorous climbing green bean producing beautiful purple mauve flowers as well as very long striped green pods which are delicious eaten fresh. When dry, the beans are striped gray on a pale background. Note that the bean hilum is not located in the center of the bean, since it is not symmetrical. It therefore gives the impression of having been slightly crushed once dry. The Semences du patrimoine organization lists this variety as being very rare. Probably come from the Mennonites of the region of Waterloo in Ontario.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris 'Mennonite'
Common names: English Mennonite Bean, Mennonite Bean
Family: Fabaceae
Beurre de Rocquencourt Bush Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nana)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Golden yellow bean with long, thin pods. Very good productivity and stability. Originally from France and previously from Algeria. The more you pick, the more it produces, over a long period of time. Its advantage lies in the ability of its pods to remain tender for several days on the plant. So advantageous for traveling gardeners or market gardeners too busy to pick their beans every day. The seeds are elongated, deep black. One of the tastiest in our collection. Beans of this type were introduced to France around the 1840s under the name Haricot d'Alger, because they supposedly originated in Algeria. From this genetic pool of black-seed beans, the French developed other varieties including butters from Rocquencourt, a town near Versailles.

Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to avoid the proliferation of diseases. With us, it is very resistant to diseases and very little watered, since it is mulched throughout the summer. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Laliberté broad bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dwarf bean that produces a legume halfway between a pea and a broad bean. According to the Potager d'Antan "In 1999, it was cultivated by 80-year-old Mr. Laliberté de Lotbinière, who confirmed the uniqueness of this plant throughout Canada. (…) Presented by the son of Mr. Laliberté to Antoine D'Avignon, a protective angel of the Semencier du Patrimoine. Died in 2003, it was his sister, Madame Gisèle Davignon who passed them on to us. »Delicious in pea soup, a traditional dish in Quebec at the beginning of the last century. This variety is considered very rare and in danger of extinction.

BOTANICAL INFORMATION
Latin name: Phaseolus vulgaris
Common names: Pea-bean, legume, bean
English: Bean
Family: Fabaceae

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Easy to maintain.
Dutch Princess bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nana 'Dutch Princess')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dwarf green bean with small, round, sweet pods. A delight! This variety was found on a seed exchange table at a Seed Festival in Frelighsburg, Quebec, in 2013. It has a name that seems old, and is not listed by seed saving organizations in the Canada or the United States. Limited quantities. VERY RARE. Anyone who can provide us with information on where it comes from would be appreciated as this is one of our best beans! Addendum In November 2016 we found a trace of a Duch Princesse bean in the "New-Zeland Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science /Experimental Agriculture" of March 1978. The origin of the bean named Duch Princess is believed to be Holland. He was also named by the seed company William Damn Seeds who would sell an improved variety from a Duch Princess bean. We find another trace of it in a research center in... Tanzania, in Arusha, (Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT)) in 1972.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to prevent the spread of disease. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Apache bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Dwarf bean giving beautiful tender and tasty green pods, rounder than flattened. Eat fresh or dry. The seed is white speckled with black and red, on one side only. A nice asymmetry. Dried grains, when cooked, are very sweet. Productive. Variety that would date from 1986, having been selected in the United States.

Fresh (green bean) or dried

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Avoid handling or removing weeds when the beans are wet to prevent the spread of disease. When the seedlings have started to sprout, ensure that the plants do not lack water until the first true leaves appear.
Téton de Vénus Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Italian red tomato. Original heart shape with a beautiful tip which, it seems, inspired its name. Very dense flesh, excellent for sauces and sandwiches. Its resistance to diseases and the abundance of its fruits compensate for its late production. I would recommend it for market gardeners, because it handles well (no pun intended) and keeps for a long time. One of our top three!

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Gradually acclimate to outdoor conditions about 10 days before planting by taking them out during the day. Lay the plants horizontally, slightly arching the plant to bring the leaves out.
Perennial Onion (Allium cepa)
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
The perennial onion is very practical in the garden. Low maintenance, it grows producing an onion tiller of about 10 or 12 onions the size of a leek. It is edible in its entirety, not just the leaves! It flowers very early in the garden, and you can separate the tiller with a shovel to transplant it to other places. It does not keep well indoors but overwinters outdoors well covered with dead leaves. Several varieties of perennial onions are available on the market, our lineage comes from Ferme Miracle.

Wait for autumn to consume.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Leave a foot with a few onions in the ground, so the following year you will have a small "grove" of onions.
Green Zebra Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Green Zebra')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Tomato striped with yellow and green, very sweet, with emerald green flesh. The fruits grow in clusters and weigh about 80-110 g. Excellent in salads, it is particularly tasty stuffed with vegetables and au gratin, since it keeps its shape even after cooking. Good sweet-acid balance.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Gradually acclimate to outdoor conditions about 10 days before planting by taking them out during the day. Lay the plants horizontally, slightly arching the plant to bring the leaves out.
Red Zebra Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Red Zebra')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
This tomato looks a lot like the Green Zebra. Its yellow-streaked red fruits grow in clusters. It is late, quite juicy, very productive and of uniform quality.

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Gradually acclimate to outdoor conditions about 10 days before planting by taking them out during the day. Lay the plants horizontally, slightly arching the plant to bring the leaves out.
Plourde tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Plourde')
3.78 $ 3.78 $ 3.7800000000000002 CAD
Plant about 1 meter high. Very round fruits about 8 cm in diameter. Rare variety of red tomato, with firm flesh and excellent taste. All red tomatoes dream of being Plourdes. Cultivated by the family of Aurélius Plourde of Saint-Alexandre de Kamouraska, Quebec, since 1925. Given to Jeannot Pelletier and later to René Paquet, who cultivated and observed it before sharing it in the Catalog des Semences du patrimoine Canada and make it available to everyone. According to René Paquet, who told the story of this Quebec treasure to Semences du patrimoine, "it's a beauty from yesteryear who, over time, unfortunately came to forget its identity. , its roots".

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Gradually acclimate to outdoor conditions about 10 days before planting by taking them out during the day. Lay the plants horizontally, slightly arching the plant to bring the leaves out.